All Tied Up

NatashaFullCover600  Natasha’s top ten Shibari tips for newbies:

1. Always be sure your partner is interested in experimenting.

2. Always ensure the rope isn’t constricting blood flow.  Rope should never be tight enough to interfere with circulation.  You should always watch skin color and for any signs of discomfort in your partner.

3. Pick a rope which is wider, and be sure to take good care of it.  Hemp is a really great choice.

4. NEVER start with suspension.  Suspension is something you should try when you’ve mastered a variety of knots and ties. Don’t start there.

5. Until you’re comfortable with shibari, make sure to wrap the rope in more loops than you’d normally use as opposed to simply tying knots.

6. Listen to your partner.

7. Don’t attempt things you don’t understand.  Start simple, not complex.

8. Keep scissors handy to cut through the rope if necessary.

9. It doesn’t matter which way you whip the ends of your rope as long as they don’t unravel.

10. SAFETY first.  Never leave your partner unattended while tied up.

And lastly, educate yourself BEFORE you delve into rope tying.

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11 thoughts on “All Tied Up

  1. pruchan November 30, 2014 / 7:42 am

    Great list but scissors are not a good safety tool. I use a safety hook that has given me fast and easy results in the past. 🙂

    -pru

    • dahliadonovanauthor December 1, 2014 / 8:20 am

      You have to get medical grade scissors, the ones that emergency rooms use to cut through close. They work like a charm.

      • pruchan December 1, 2014 / 8:47 am

        Rope is very different from light fabric. It takes forever to cut through rope with those flimsy scissors.

      • dahliadonovanauthor December 1, 2014 / 8:52 am

        It really depends on the scissors. Surgical scissors made to cut through everything from denim to thick winter coats. I think they’re sometimes called rescue sheers. You have to get the heavy duty kind though, because I agree completely that a lot of the lighter weight ones are very flimsy.

  2. pruchan December 1, 2014 / 8:52 am

    I understand but I would still rather spend the extra money to make sure that my bottom is safe and can be cut out quickly and efficiently. I don’t know of any professional rigger that uses surgical shears. Personally, I would not recommend them to anyone but to each his own.

    • dahliadonovanauthor December 1, 2014 / 8:53 am

      I actually approached a shibari master for his opinion before I posted the article because I wanted his thoughts on what he uses personally.

      • pruchan December 1, 2014 / 8:54 am

        Ahhh! Sorry, i assumed you were talking about the light weight shears instead of the steel ones. I still like my hook but I do have a pair of the heavy duty shears, just in case. 😉

      • dahliadonovanauthor December 1, 2014 / 8:55 am

        I need to go back and include examples at some point lol.

      • pruchan December 1, 2014 / 8:55 am

        Which shibari master?

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