I’m Sensing a Theme

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Five gifts Teo and Motts (from Poisoned Primrose) would want:

1. Teo: Yarn

Motts: Origami Paper

2. Teo: Historical Books

Motts: Plants

3. Teo: Chocolate

Motts: Chocolate

4. Teo: Chocolate

Motts: Chocolate

5. Teo: Chocolate

Motts: Chocolate

(Image by Alexander Stein from Pixabay)

Anticipation.

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What was the most difficult part of writing Poisoned Primrose?

Waiting.

That’s it.

That was the only hard part of writing late year’s NaNoWriMo novel.

I had the idea for Pineapple Mottley almost a full year before I was able to write her story. I began creating the book bible (where I put research, plot notes, etc) long before I wrote a single word. It was the story I wanted to write.

I had to slog through three other stories first.

And they were a slog.

2019 was a hard year where each story seemed harder to write than the last.

When I finally got to Poisoned Primrose, it felt like the heavens opened and the angels were singing. The book was a joy to write from beginning to end. None of it was hard.

I didn’t have to push myself or struggle for what happened next.

It was bliss.

 

Ten Facts about Cactus

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An introduction to Cactus, one of the lovely animals featured in my upcoming cosy mystery, Poisoned Primrose.

1. Motts’s best friend

2. Wears sweaters

3. Enjoys walks in the garden

4. A classic snuggler

5. Gossips with Motts’s turtle

6. A lap cat

7. Addicted to cat nip

8. Chases butterflies

9. A very, very, very social sort of beast

10. A finicky eater

Cover of the Month Contest.

They say not to judge a book by its cover but I need you to do just that. If you liked the cover of my book, Poisoned Primrose (Motts Cold Case Mystery Book 1), please vote for it for the Cover of the Month contest on AllAuthor.com!

I’m getting closer to clinch the “Cover of the Month” contest on AllAuthor! I’d need as much support from you guys. Please take a short moment to vote for my book cover here:
Click to Vote!

 

Where the green grass grows…

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There’s a garden/gardening theme in quite a few of my books. It’s interesting considering I don’t have a garden and I’m allergic to most flowers. If I even have a bouquet in the house, I’ll be sneezing my head off in minutes.

I love gardening, though. My grandfather was a farmer. He prided himself on his roses and his vegetable/fruit patches.

My father-in-law is the son of farmers. He grew up on a farm. And my mother-in-law, may she rest in peace, loved her garden.

I think my love of the idea of having a patch of veggies and fruits to tend myself comes across in certain stories of mine: Here Comes The Son and Primrose Poison, in particular. Lalo and Motts, in their respective stories, both love working with their hands. And they have greener thumbs than mine would be.

For Lalo, gardening is a passion but also what he feels is his life’s purpose. It comes in handy during his adventure. And could even be considered to be a saving grace.

In Poisoned Primrose, Motts treats her garden like a third pet. And, quite a bit of the dramatics in her mystery start in her garden. But that’s my fault, not hers. =)

Do you garden? Is your thumb green or black? I’d love to try gardening, I’m just not sure I have a talent for it.

 

Staying Focused in Crisis

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How do you write in the middle of a global pandemic?

It’s definitely a conversation going around the writing community. Here are a few things I’ve been considering/doing/whatever.

  1. I accept that some days I just don’t have the mental, physical, and/or emotional energy to put pen to paper.  I try to be kind to myself in those moments and not stress. Words will happen eventually.
  2. Write something that brings me joy. Now, at least for me, isn’t the time to write something that feels like pulling teeth.
  3. Turn off social media and the news. Nothing kills my writing vibe than a constant influx of bad and overwhelming information.
  4. Take breaks. Seriously. Take a walk, read a book, watch my favourite TV show. Anything but trying to be creative.
  5. Find a new routine. I’m autistic. Routines are in my DNA. So, I’ve definitely had to add a new normal into the structure of my day.

What are you doing to keep focused?