What I overthought…

….in Ghost Light Killer.

First? The killer and their motive. I can’t giveaway too much because spoilers. But…I definitely had to rethink aspects of the mystery a few times.

Second? The ghost. Again. Spoilers. You’ll see when you read the book.

Third? Myron.

Fourth? Ian’s musical.

Fifth? The ending, which I erased and rewrote at least once to get it perfect.

4 Things I Love about the Apartment…

…in Ghost Light Killer.

Osian and Dannel have an epic setup. They live in a building owned by Danny’s family–so no rent. They do have to keep an eye on their neighbour’s and help clean up. All things considered, they’ve got the best of everything.

So what do I love about it?

The Neighbours

There is an eclectic group of people who live in the apartment building. Ian is probably my favourite secondary character. He’s a riot.

The View

They live in Covent Garden and have a colourful and eclectic view out the window.

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The Building

The apartment building was built in the 40s…and looks like it. It’s lovely. Check out my Pinterest for the visual reference I used.

The Kitchen

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Motts’s Fave Try Channel Videos

Motts generally prefers YouTube to movies or tv shows. The Try Channel is one of her favourites. I thought it would be fun to make a list of her favourite videos of theirs.

In no particular order…

All of the videos featuring durian.

Strongest Alcohol

The Toe of Satan Video

Easter Eggs

Absinthe

Drunk Lego

Fiery 5 Challenge

Drunk Battleship

One Chip Channel

Death Nut Challenge (honestly, all of the heat challenges are hilarious)

The Pierced Peony Playlist

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For most books I write, I have at least one music playlist. I thought I’d share ten of the songs from the Pierced Peony’s list.

  1. Shotgun – George Ezra
  2. A Sky Full of Star – Coldplay
  3. When We Were On Fire – James Bay
  4. I Bet on You – Lissie
  5. The Game – Amy Macdonald
  6. Gloria – Lumineers
  7. Do Right – Wild Rivers
  8. Bottom of the Sea – Sean McConnell
  9. I Know the Way Home – Andrew Galucki
  10. Give Me Something – Callum Scott

Review: Real World Homecoming

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I’m old enough to remember the first season of the Real World. I enjoyed the first three or four seasons but felt it devolved a bit around the fifth or sixth, maybe? Somewhere around there.

When they announced a reunion for the first season, I was intrigued. Would it be as good as I remembered? How would the cast have changed?

This felt like a microcosm of being a nostalgic adult, who was a teen in the 90s.

Not sure if that makes sense.

It was nostalgic yet somehow the show and the people had progressed. Conversations had changed yet remained the same somehow. (And some people had definitely not changed much at all.)

It was interesting to see them all grown up, having in-depth conversations about the world and how they changed it. Growing up in the house of fundie missionaries, the Real World was one of the first places I saw open conversations about race and sexuality. (Don’t take a shot every time I write the word conversation.)

On nostalgia alone, I’d give the six episode (was it six?) series five stars.

And also for not shying away from difficult conversations.

Why I now use an outline: redux

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In the interest of full disclosure (does anyone else love using that phrase?), I’ve written a few posts about outlines over the years. I think I even had one in January. The things is that my opinions have evolved since I began writing.

And I thought I’d revisit the subject.

The short answer to why I now use an outline is: I have a shit memory and not having an outline was affecting my ability to write a cohesive mystery series.

And that was the ‘short’ answer.

The long answer? I have a shit memory and not having an outline was affecting my ability to write a cohesive mystery series.

Just kidding.

Looking back, my fear of outlines comes directly from learning about them in school. I hated the rigidness of them. And also, they never made sense to me. At all.

It randomly struck me last year that an outline could be whatever worked for me.

I began with a cobbled together version of a tree branch mind map. That morphed to include a bastardized version of  the beat sheet. And finally, I began doing a chapter by chapter one sentence breakdown that I updated as I write.

The latter is the most recent addition.

I’ve found it really helpful was I’m writing to jot down a sentence or a thought for what’s going to come in the future chapters. With a mystery, I don’t want to be stumbling for clues as the writer. And I’ve done that a few times in the past.

It’s been a revelation toward making my writing life easier.

How about you? How do you outline your novels?