The Toxic Productivity Trap

KODAK Digital Still Camera

In the midst of the current state of crisis and upheaval, we’re all mostly at home in self-isolation. Or, we should be. And I keep seeing all these ‘ways to stay active and productive’ videos and blog posts.

On the one hand, I do think finding a new routine is essential, particularly for those not used to working from home.

As someone who has worked from home for years, it’s important to keep yourself motivated. And it can be infinitely more difficult when you’re not in an office.

But.

But.

But, I think productivity at times like this can be a dangerous and unhealthy trap.

We put our health to one side. We base too much of our self-worth into what we accomplish. And then, we seem to fall into a cycle of work, work, work, and not much else.

In a global crisis, maybe the best thing we can do is take care of ourselves–and each other.

Maybe the most ‘productive’ thing I can do is read a good book or play one of my favourite video games.

There’s nothing wrong with accomplishing.

Crossing items of your to-do list can become a bit of an addiction. But we shouldn’t be beating ourselves up for relaxing either. Doing nothing can be the healthiest part of your routine.

So, maybe while we’re all busy being productive. We should pencil time into our do to do nothing at all. Relax. Read a book. Binge-watch a new TV show. Something fun.

 

 

What am I reading?

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I have not read as many books this year thus far as I hoped. Well, I’ve read a lot of cosy mysteries, but not much else. Sometimes with my reading, my autistic obsessive passion kicks in, and I’ll fall down a rabbit hole of reading ALL the same things over and over.

And usually, throughout a year, I’ll read a lot of non-fiction.

Not so much in 2019.

But I thought I’d share my top three so far, which might change.

I wouldn’t say these are my favourite non-fiction of all time. I did enjoy them for different reasons, though Jason Fox’s book probably makes it into my top ten non-fiction of all time. Or, maybe top twenty. (I’ve read A LOT of non-fiction over the years.)

  1. Battle Scars by Jason Fox – Solid 10 out of 10 read. Not a book everyone will enjoy, but I found his battle with PTSD to be inspiring.
  2. Newsletter Ninja by  Tammi Labrecque – makes the list because not only was it highly useful but it made me laugh.
  3. Manage Your Day-to-Day: Build Your Routine, Find Your Focus, and Sharpen Your Creative Mind edited by Jocelyn Glei – so, I have mixed feelings about this book. It did give me a powerful new perspective on adjusting my daily schedule in a way that works for me and encourages my creative process. On the other hand, I found a lot of it to just…be nonsense (from my perspective.)

I’ve read a lot of military memoirs up to this point so far in 2019. One was because my hubby got it for himself and I wanted to read it. He’s a slow reader so I got it first.

How about you?

Do you read a lot of non-fiction?