What I overthought…

….in Ghost Light Killer.

First? The killer and their motive. I can’t giveaway too much because spoilers. But…I definitely had to rethink aspects of the mystery a few times.

Second? The ghost. Again. Spoilers. You’ll see when you read the book.

Third? Myron.

Fourth? Ian’s musical.

Fifth? The ending, which I erased and rewrote at least once to get it perfect.

4 Things I Love about the Apartment…

…in Ghost Light Killer.

Osian and Dannel have an epic setup. They live in a building owned by Danny’s family–so no rent. They do have to keep an eye on their neighbour’s and help clean up. All things considered, they’ve got the best of everything.

So what do I love about it?

The Neighbours

There is an eclectic group of people who live in the apartment building. Ian is probably my favourite secondary character. He’s a riot.

The View

They live in Covent Garden and have a colourful and eclectic view out the window.

Photo by Pierre Blachu00e9 on Pexels.com

The Building

The apartment building was built in the 40s…and looks like it. It’s lovely. Check out my Pinterest for the visual reference I used.

The Kitchen

Photo by Gary Barnes on Pexels.com

The Pierced Peony Playlist

giphy

For most books I write, I have at least one music playlist. I thought I’d share ten of the songs from the Pierced Peony’s list.

  1. Shotgun – George Ezra
  2. A Sky Full of Star – Coldplay
  3. When We Were On Fire – James Bay
  4. I Bet on You – Lissie
  5. The Game – Amy Macdonald
  6. Gloria – Lumineers
  7. Do Right – Wild Rivers
  8. Bottom of the Sea – Sean McConnell
  9. I Know the Way Home – Andrew Galucki
  10. Give Me Something – Callum Scott

Writing the villain…

Photo by Anthony Shkraba on Pexels.com

….was a tricky endeavour.

I won’t spoil anything but writing the villain in Pierced Peony gave me nightmares. Mostly because as always, I worried about making the villain a caricature. I prefer even the not so good characters to feel like real people.

For better or worse, I want my characters to feel like people you could meet in real life.

The scariest villains, in my opinion, are ones who seem like real people. Someone who could live next door to you—but hopefully doesn’t because, you know. My neighbour the murderer wouldn’t be the best surprise, would it?

I mean, in a book in might, not necessarily in my day to day life.

As with any good mystery, Motts’s journey to finding the villain in Pierced Peony isn’t straightforward. There were surprises for her (and for myself.) Overall though, I’m pleased with the result.

My Favourite Scene in Pierced Peony

Photo by Laker on Pexels.com

The ‘redacted for spoilers’ scene in the fishery warehouse is probably one of my all-time favourite moments to write for Motts so far.

It was also my least favourite scene to write, mostly because of how difficult it was to get right.

Motts is a unique character.  It’s not always easy to get her voice perfect in the first draft. And as an autistic character, I work extra hard to ensure she’s authentically herself.

As an autistic author, I definitely put all of my heart and soul into my autistic characters.

The ‘redacted’ scene had to show danger, fear, and panic. It was critical to write from the perspective of an autistic. Our experiences can often be quite different from neurotypicals from what I’ve seen.

By the final draft of Pierced Peony, I felt as if I’d done the fishery scene justice. I’d shown Motts’s experience as well as I could on paper. It felt visceral to me and I hope to everyone else who reads it.

Writing is Hard

Every novel has moments within that were incredibly difficult to get perfect. Maybe it’s the scene itself. Or, perhaps the words aren’t flowing well. I wanted to share three from Pierced Peony that I found especially hard.

The first is the doll scene. I won’t give too many details to avoid spoilers. But, you’ll know the doll scene when you get to it.

This one was hard because I wanted the reader to have an almost visceral reaction to it. The difficult part was make sure I didn’t go overboard. There was a delicate line between creepy and caricature.

I wanted the reader to turn the page and be able to almost feel like they’d been in the room with Motts.

Second? The freezer scene. Again…spoilers. This one was difficult because writing dangerous moments don’t always come naturally to me. Banter is something I find easy.

Danger? Not so much. The freezer scene was written…deleted…written…deleted a number of times. I did finally get the vibe I wanted, though.

The final scene that I struggled with? The ending. I won’t give anything away. But I knew how I wanted Pierced Peony to conclude and it was incredibly important to do it justice.

And hopefully, I got it just right.

Why I Love The First Line….

…of Pierced Peony.

A cat, a turtle, and a stranger face off in the garden. The stranger blinks first. Right. The joke still needs some work.

That’s the first line. And I love it.

So why do I love it? Here’s five reasons why.

  1. It makes me laugh. Seriously. At the very least, whenever I see it, the line makes me smile.
  2. It’s just so Motts. I can see her thinking this line really frequently or some variation of it.
  3. The line sets the stage for the cozy series in that you know I’m not going to take myself to seriously.
  4. I believe cozy mysteries require a healthy sense of humor.
  5. It’s sort of a running joke for me with the series.